By Laura Araujo

November 4, 2020

So how long have you been in a relationship with your phone? Don’t laugh! It’s a serious question. And here’s another one: is your relationship a healthy one? Don’t worry, I’m not recommending that the two of you you break up. However, like any healthy relationship, both parties need some alone time to tend to

Read More

By Laura Araujo

October 30, 2020

“Not now. I need to focus.” “Ugh. I just can’t seem to focus right now.” How many times have you uttered these statements? If you’re like most of us, probably more times than you care to admit. And yet, we make those statements almost offhandedly, as if there’s nothing we can do about it other

Read More

By Laura Araujo

October 1, 2020

Phillippa Lally, a psychology researcher at University College London, studied 96 people over the span of 12 weeks measuring how long it took for them to form a habit. She found that it takes approximately 66 days before a habit becomes automatic – although even that was variable based upon the individual, their circumstances, and presumably their genetic make-up and inclination towards sensory impulse and instant gratification.

So while you may have heard that 21 days is enough to “reset,” unfortunately, whoever told you that is likely trying to sell you quick-fix program, leading you to disappointment.

In reality, while the average habit-formation time was 66 days, Lally found that it can take anywhere from 18 to 254 days to get things cemented in. Habits take time.

Read More

By Laura Araujo

August 19, 2020

When your brain isn’t focused on a task, it switches into autopilot mode whenever it can. This switch to automatic processing allows your brain to rest its prefrontal cortex.

Autopilot can be incredibly helpful, especially when we are talking about brushing our teeth, flossing, dressing ourselves, checking the mail, cleaning the kitchen, it saves us unnecessary decision-making.

The danger is when we don’t notice that we’ve slipped into this mode.

Read More

By Laura Araujo

August 12, 2020

Not only does constantly striving to achieve things potentially up our cortisol levels and mess up our microbiome, it creates neuropathways that are not conducive to a mindful existence. In other words, the more we focus on doing things, the more our mind rewires around that, which makes us harder to be mindful — which, in case you’ve not been following along, ain’t so great.

So how do we mindfully go the other direction? By getting more rest.

Read More